Witham Flower Delivery

Witham Florists for Funeral flowers wreaths and tributesWitham flowers and gifts by Witham florists in EssexWitham Wedding flowers by specialist Witham Florists for Bridal Flowers and ButtonholesFruit baskets and gifts by local florists in Witham in Essex

Blossom Florists is a caring, local family florists in Witham. We deliver flowers and gifts in the Witham area fromFlowers and funeral flowers and weddings by local Witham Florists Monday to Saturday. Working from a flower studio in Witham rather than a florists shops means your flowers are not picked up and handled by other customers like they are in a florists shop. We have fresh flowers delivered everyday and they are only handled only once, by our florists, before being included in a beautiful bouquet or funeral tribute. This also means you get great value for money, free delivery and a 5% online discount too! You can contact us on Witham 01376 519814 or email us on help@witham-florist.co.uk
Blossom, your Essex Florist delivering in Witham & surrounding local areas.

Blossom Florists deliver flowers for all occasions.  We are also specialist wedding and funeral florists.  We can supply gorgeous wedding and bridal flowers for your wedding in Witham or beautiful funeral arrangements and tributes for delivery to the local undertaker director, funeral home, crematorium, home or the church.  We are a local, family run florist providing free flower delivery throughout Witham, Silver End, Rivenhall, White Notley, Terling, Faulkbourne, Fairstead, Hatfield Peverel, Kelvedon, Great Braxted, Little Braxted, Great Totham, Little Totham, Wickham Bishops and other local villages and towns. We deliver direct from our own flower workshop and pride ourselves on the quality of our flowers and strive to deliver the freshest possible blooms! You can receive a special 5% discount when you order online at our florists online shop!!! You can also call 01376 519814

We can deliver chocolates, balloons and teddies with your order to make your delivery an even more special gift. Bespoke Weddings- funerals- functions- anniversary- roses- Birthdays- with love- new baby- thanks- get well soon-cheer up-Mother's Day-Valentines-Christmas and all occasions.


Witham Flower Delivery

At Blossom Florists we pride ourselves on delivery great value for money, the freshest possible blooms and excellent florist customer service in Witham and other towns and villages in Essex. As a florist we can deliver many gifts in Witham including handtied bouquets, wedding flowers, funeral tributes and gift baskets. We don't charge delivery in Witham in Essex. Blossom Florists delivers to all of the undertakers in the Witham area. We have listed below their contact details.

Hunnaball of Witham, Funeral Director, 1 Coach House Way, Witham CM8 1YJ. Phone: 01376 511592

East of England Co-operative Funerals, 115B Newland St, Witham, Essex CM8 1BE, Phone:01376 520870

G. Collins & Sons Funeral Directors, 4 The St, White Notley, Witham CM8 1RH, Phone:01376 583750

East Of England Co-operative Funerals, 213A High St, Kelvedon, Essex CO5 9JD, Phone:01376 573627

History of Witham

Early history

Excavations by Essex County Council field archaeological unit at the recent Maltings Lane development discovered evidence of Neolithic occupation of Witham including human remains and several trackways across ancient marsh. Excavations of the Witham Lodge (Ivy Chimneys) area of the town unveiled remains of a Roman temple in the 1970s as well as a pottery kiln. This would have been alongside the main Roman road from London to Colchester and used as a stop over point on the long journey, another notable find during the excavation was a Votive Offering pool in the grounds of the temple, the pool contained several artefacts that would have been offered to the gods. In 913, according to the Anglo Saxon Chronicle, Edward the Elder marched from Hertford to reconquer Essex and made an encampment here on his route to set up a base at Maldon. Witham's position on the Roman road in relation to the major Viking army based at Colchester was the most likely reason for this and it would have effectively cut Essex in two.

The name Witham is Saxon in origin and remains unchanged in spelling. The parish of Witham appears in the Domesday Book of 1086.[3] The manor of Witham was given to the Knights Templar in 1148. To the north of the current town is Cressing Temple which was the earliest foundation of Templar lands in Britain, built over 700 years ago. Wickham Bishops

The town as it is now started life on 'Chipping Hill', where the old forge and the church still exist to this day. As the years went by, the hamlet grew to become 'Witham' and St Nicolas Church of England Church (a unique spelling) serves a congregation of around 150 people each Sunday. During the latter half of the 18th century and the early 19th century, Admiral Sir William Luard was the town's most prominent citizen, a resident of Chipping Hill and a founder and patron of St. Nicolas' Church. His funeral cortege through the town in 1910 was witnessed by thousands.

Witham briefly enjoyed a period as an affluent spa town after the discovery of a mineral-bearing spa in the town by Dr Taverner in the 18th century. Witham was also a centre of the wool trade until the decline of the industry in the late 17th century.

1 September 1905

Main article: Witham rail crash

Witham Station 1 September 1905.

Witham railway station was the scene of a serious accident on Saturday 1 September 1905. The 09:27 London Liverpool Street to Cromer 14 coaches express derailed whilst travelling at speed through the station. 10 passengers and a Luggage Porter were killed when several of the carriages somersaulted on to the platforms causing considerable damage to the rolling stock and the station. 71 passengers were seriously injured.[4] This remains to this day the worst single loss of life in a railway accident in Essex. In 2005 an opportunity to commemorate the centenary was missed and the incident is now largely forgotten. Ben Sainty, a signalman, whose quick action averted the next train hitting the wreckage has a road named after him in the town, Ben Sainty Court.

Post War

The town expanded greatly in the late 1960s and 1970s when the Greater London Council built 3 large council estates on the west and north sides of the town and a smaller one to the South for families from London to move to as part of the 'New Town' and 'Expanded Town' overspill policy of that time.

Starting in the 1980s but accelerating in the 1990s and 2000s a large number of houses were built in several estates to the south and southwest of the town infilling the farmland that used to exist between the town and the A12 bypass. The most recent of which is the Maltings Lane development, which when completed will exceed 1200 homes, a school, business park and community shopping area.

A one time famous resident of the town is the author Dorothy L. Sayers whose statue stands opposite the town's library. The library stands on the site of the old Whitehall cinema, which closed in the late 1970s.